Massive Instant Direct Communication: How dangerous is it?

Ever since the dawn of time, humans have evolved technology to increase the efficiency of communication, from runners to telegraphs to computers. It is so easy now to message someone from across the world with just a few strokes of the keyboard. Now, we have developed fiber optic cables, which are able to transmit information faster than the electrons running through telephone polls. We have become so used to instant communication that, unfortunately, we have become addicted to it instead of using it when needed. Is this massive direct instant communication actually hurting us socially?

There are two sides to this argument. One is that because we have massive instant direct communication (which I will now be referring to as MIDC for the sake of word count and easy reading) has made our lives better because we can keep in touch with other people whenever we feel like it, which boosts efficiency and decreases loneliness. The other is that we have become so attached to our virtual lives that we have unfortunately put our constant connection first before experiencing the world around us.

As for my opinion? I would say that there are some benefits and downsides, but that’s not really that matters. What matters is getting people to understand both sides and to evenly balance it out. If you are spending too much time on your phone, computer, or other device that gets you connected, spend some time disconnected by exercising, meeting up with friends, or other such activity. If you are not spending enough time connected, make sure you do because, like it or not, the world is transitioning online.

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